Article 54(11); Nov 2011
Review Articles
The changing trends in live birth statistics in Korea, 1970 to 2010
Jae Woo Lim
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2011;54(11):429-435.   Published online November 30, 2011

Although Korean population has been growing steadily during the past four decades, the nation is rapidly becoming an aging society because of its declining birth rate combined with an increasing life expectancy. In addition, Korea has one of the lowest fertility rates in the world due to fewer married couples, advanced maternal age, and falling birth rate. The prevalence of...

Secular trends of body sizes in Korean children and adolescents: from 1965 to 2010
Jin Soo Moon
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2011;54(11):436-442.   Published online November 30, 2011

An anthropometric survey is one of the most important approaches to use when evaluating the health status of children. Secular trends in body sizes, such as height, weight, head circumference, chest circumference, and body mass index showed significant changes over 40 years in Korea. A series of periodic surveys were conducted in 1967, 1975, 1985, 1997, and 2005 by the...

Changes in the neonatal and infant mortality rate and the causes of death in Korea
Sung-Hoon Chung, Yong-Sung Choi, Chong-Woo Bae
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2011;54(11):443-455.   Published online November 30, 2011

Neonatal mortality rate (NMR) or infant mortality rate (IMR) are the rate of deaths per 1,000 live births at which babies of either less than four weeks or of one year of age die, respectively. The NMR and IMR are commonly accepted as a measure of the general health and wellbeing of a population. Korea's NMR and IMR fell significantly...

Original Articles
Effect of respiratory syncytial virus infection on regulated on activation, normal T-cells expressed and secreted production in a murine model of asthma
Yanghua Ju, Seung Jun Choi, Huisu Lee, Hyun Sook Kim, Sulmui Won, Yoon Hong Chun, Jong-Seo Yoon, Hyun Hee Kim, Joon Sung Lee
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2011;54(11):456-462.   Published online November 30, 2011
Purpose

Synthesis of regulated on activation, normal T-cells expressed and secreted (RANTES) in the airway has previously been shown to be elevated after respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. However, since few studies have examined whether RSV-infected asthma patients express a higher level of RANTES than do normal individuals, we used a murine model of asthma to address this question.

Methods

We prepared Dermatophagoides...

Validation study of the Dinamap ProCare 200 upper arm blood pressure monitor in children and adolescents
Chong Guk Lee, Hyang Mi Park, Hye Jung Shin, Jin Soo Moon, Yeong Mi Hong, Nam Soo Kim, Il Soo Ha, Myeong Jin Chang, Kyeong Won Oh
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2011;54(11):463-469.   Published online November 30, 2011
Purpose

To validate the Dinamap ProCare 200 blood pressure (BP) monitor against a mercury sphygmomanometer in children 7 to 18 years old in accordance with the 2010 International Protocol of European Society of Hypertension (ESH-IP2) and the British Hypertension Society (BHS) protocol.

Methods

Forty-five children were recruited for the study. A validation procedure was performed following the protocol based on the ESH-IP2 and...

Case Reports
Familial hyperkalemic periodic paralysis caused by a de novo mutation in the sodium channel gene SCN4A
Ji-Yeon Han, June-Bum Kim
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2011;54(11):470-472.   Published online November 30, 2011

Familial hyperkalemic periodic paralysis (HYPP) is an autosomaldominant channelopathy characterized by transient and recurrent episodes of paralysis with concomitant hyperkalemia. Mutations in the skeletal muscle voltage-gated sodium channel gene SCN4A have been reported to be responsible for this disease. Here, we report the case of a 16-year-old girl with HYPP whose mutational analysis revealed a heterozygous c.2111C>T substitution in the...

Hypokalemic periodic paralysis; two different genes responsible for similar clinical manifestations
Hunmin Kim, Hee Hwang, Hae Il Cheong, Hye Won Park
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2011;54(11):473-476.   Published online November 30, 2011

Primary hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HOKPP) is an autosomal dominant disorder manifesting as recurrent periodic flaccid paralysis and concomitant hypokalemia. HOKPP is divided into type 1 and type 2 based on the causative gene. Although 2 different ion channels have been identified as the molecular genetic cause of HOKPP, the clinical manifestations between the 2 groups are similar. We report the...

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