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Review Article
Allergy
Food allergies and food-induced anaphylaxis: role of cofactors
Meeyong shin
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2021;64(8):393-399.   Published online November 12, 2020
Question: What are the roles of cofactors in food allergies and food-induced anaphylaxis?
Finding: Cofactors reportedly play a role in approximately 14%–30% of anaphylactic reactions. Cofactors such as exercise, infection, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, dehydration, and alcohol can increase intestinal permeability and antigen uptake, thereby causing allergic symptoms.
Meaning: Routine assessment of the possible involvement of cofactors is essential for the management of patients with food-induced anaphylaxis.
Pollen-food allergy syndrome in children
You Hoon Jeon
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2020;63(12):463-468.   Published online May 14, 2020
The prevalence of pollen-food allergy syndrome (PFAS) in Korean children with pollen allergy was recently reported to be 42.7%. PFAS can cause a wide range of symptoms from mild allergy to severe anaphylaxis depending on the nature of food allergens that share the epitopes with pollen. Cases of anaphylaxis caused by PFAS have recently increased. Treatments for PFAS should be individualized for patients according to the severity of symptoms.
Original Article
Allergy
The relationships among birth season, sunlight exposure during infancy, and allergic disease
Jung Min Hwang, Se Hyun Oh, Mee Yong Shin
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2016;59(5):218-225.   Published online May 31, 2016
Purpose

The recent increase in the prevalence of allergic diseases is hypothetically attributed to immune dysregulation in turn caused by a reduction in exposure to sunlight. We explored relationships between birth season, sunlight exposure, exercise duration, and an allergic disease.

Methods

We performed a questionnaire-based survey on allergic diseases among elementary school students. Birth time was categorized according to the season (summer and...

Food allergen sensitization in young children with typical signs and symptoms of immediate-type food allergies: a comparison between monosensitized and polysensitized children
Na Yeon Kim, Ga Ram Kim, Joon Hwan Kim, Ji Hyeon Baek, Jung Won Yoon, Hye Mi Jee, Hye Sung Baek, Yong Ho Jung, Sun Hee Choi, Ki Eun Kim, Youn Ho Shin, Hye Yung Yum, Man Yong Han, Kyu-Earn Kim
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2015;58(9):330-335.   Published online September 21, 2015
Purpose

The clinical interpretation of children sensitized to allergens is challenging, particularly in children with food allergies. We aimed to examine clinical differences between children with monosensitization and those with polysensitization to common food allergens and to determine risk factors for polysensitization in young children <10 years of age with immediate-type food allergies.

Methods

The study included children <10 years of age with...

Review Article
Food protein-induced proctocolitis: Is this allergic disorder a reality or a phantom in neonates?
Jin-Bok Hwang, Jeana Hong
Clin Exp Pediatr. 2013;56(12):514-518.   Published online December 20, 2013

The etiology of small and fresh rectal bleeding in neonates who are not sick is usually unknown; the only known cause is food protein-induced proctocolitis (FPIPC). It has been recently reported that FPIPC is a rare cause of rectal bleeding in newborns, and most cases have been proved to be due to idiopathic neonatal transient colitis. A recommended strategy for...

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